News archives

22 June 2015

News from Matrix Biology journal

Dear Fellow Matrix Biologists,

I am pleased to share with you the new impact factor for Matrix Biology: 5.07

Notice also that ranking has moved to a Q1 category! (see below)

I wish to thank all of you for your contribution to this enormous jump and hope you will continue submitting your best work to the journal. I truly believe that our field is not a “Niche field” but one of the largest in all the fields of biomedical science.

2014: 5.074  (ranked   49 of 289-Q1 journals in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)
2013: 3.648  (ranked   99 of 291-Q2 journals in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)
2012: 3.190  (ranked  116 of 290-Q2 journals in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)
2011: 3.299  (ranked  113 of 290-Q2 journals in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)
2010: 3.328 (ranked   114 of 286-Q2 journals in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

All the best,

Renato V. Iozzo, M.D., Ph.D.

Editor-In-Chief, Matrix Biology

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April 24, 2015

News from Matrix Biology journal

From Renato Iozzo, Editor-in-Chief of Matrix Biology:

Dear Fellow Matrix Biologists,

I would like to give you a brief update on the activities and initiatives of our journal Matrix Biology.

1. We have changed and improved the style of Matrix Biology. The essence of the changes is summarized in a brief commentary appropriately called “Cosmetics for the matrix”
2. The first issue contains a large review by myself and Liliana Schaefer that took over 2.5 years to complete. We propose a comprehensive nomenclature of the proteoglycan gene families
3. The first issue also contain two outstanding research papers from the Bjorn Olsen laboratory and from the Tom Wight laboratory
4. Click on the links to read Matrix Biology Highlights and Matrix Biologists in Action (crazy proteoglycan people at the PG Gordon of 2014!).

I hope you will continue sending your best research to the journal. Do not hesitate to contact me if you have any idea/suggestion for improvement, or any proposal for thematic issues.

All the best to all of you,
Renato V. Iozzo, M.D., Ph.D.
Editor-In-Chief, Matrix Biology

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January 2015

In memoriam:

Stephen Krane Obituary

The matrix biology community to saddened to learn of the loss of Dr Steve Krane M.D., a founder member of ISMB and one of the greats in the field, on January 19, 2015. Below are tributes to Steve’s life and work by Mary and Steve Goldring, and by Michel van der Rest.

From Mary and Steve Goldring:

We are sad to report the passing of long-time member, Stephen M. Krane, M.D. at the age of 87 on Jan. 19 after a long illness. Steve was a well-known researcher, scientist, and a mentor to many of us in the field of matrix biology, but also in the bone and rheumatology fields.  After receiving both his undergraduate and medical degrees from Columbia University and serving in the U.S. Navy at the end of World War II, he was an intern in Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). After a research fellowship in biological chemistry at Washington University in St. Louis, he returned to the MGH as Chief Resident. Through his more than 62-year tenure, he served as the head of the Arthritis Unit and Arthritis Research Laboratory at the MGH and as Persis, Cyrus and Marlow B. Harrison Distinguished Professor of Clinical Medicine and was the first Master of the Walter Bradford Cannon Society at Harvard Medical School. His early research addressed thyroid endocrinology, and then spanned bone biology and metabolic bone disease to inflammatory mechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis and other joint diseases. He is best known to ISMB members for his work on collagenase and collagen synthesis and the mechanisms of tissue degradation in genetic and acquired diseases. PubMed lists 191 papers published during his career.

In the MGH history book, Something in the Ether, he is recognized for establishing rheumatology as a true scientific discipline at the MGH and is quoted as stating humbly that: ‘In rheumatology during my time, we had good people and discovered some interesting things. We were looking for how joints get destroyed in rheumatoid arthritis and bone disease, and we discovered the enzymes that are involved in breaking down the joint structure, collagenases. At the time it was a big discovery.’”

He received numerous awards over the course of his career, including an honorary medical degree from the University of Geneva, Switzerland and the William F. Neuman Award from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. He was a Guggenheim Fellow, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and recipient of several other awards, including the Heberden Medal (London), and the Distinguished Investigator Award of the American College of Rheumatology.

Among his devoted colleagues who worked with him directly were Edward (Ted) D Harris, Jr., Melvin Glimcher, Jean-Michel Dayer, Ed Amento, and Steven and Mary Goldring. We all would attribute to him changing the course of our careers and instilling in us high standards of scientific integrity. All those who worked with him will recall his astounding memory, his sense of humor, and his quick wit. His love of learning was exemplified by the stacks of journals, manuscripts, correspondence, and notebooks on his desk, chairs, tables, and sofa in his office with a sign above it all reading “A NEAT DESK IS THE SIGN OF A SICK MIND.”

He is survived by his sons David, Peter, Ian and Adam and their families, including 7 grandchildren, and was predeceased by his wife, Cynthia. A celebration for both Stephen and Cynthia will be held at a later date. His obituary can be viewed at www.levinechapel.com.

From Michel van der Rest:

Stephen M. Krane M.D. (1927-2015), a great scientist and a great friend.

It is with great sorrow that the Matrix Biology community has learned that Steve Krane passed away on January 19 after a long illness and a little more than a year after his wife Cynthia, well known to many of us, had also passed away.

Steve was a very inspiring scientist, making a close link between the clinical questions and the most basic research. The understanding of all the agents and parameters involved in pathological degradation of the matrix has been at the heart of his scientific career in a direct relationship of course with his clinical duties as a rheumatologist. He has been at the heart of many of the major contributions that the Boston school in extracellular matrix biology has made. The keywords linked to Steve Krane’s publications are collagenases, matrix metalloproteinases, interleukin, parathyroid hormone, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, Paget’s disease, and many others.

Steve had an extraordinary sharp mind and this made him a very critical but reliable reviewer. I had the chance to go through site visits to my lab chaired by Steve and this was a very rewarding, but also somewhat frightening experience. Steve had that remarkable ability to ask, in his usual very friendly fashion, those simple questions that are so pertinent and so difficult to answer. But I think that our long lasting personal friendship originated from these encounters.

I had the chance to stay with Steve and Cynthia on several occasions, both in Waban and in Woods Hole and they also visited us in France on a couple of occasions. The experience of being hosted by Cynthia and Steve was always extraordinary. Cynthia was a very attentive host and Steve a remarkable cook. All those of us who had the chance to have a meal prepared by Steve do certainly remember him, with his apron and his big smile, serving exquisitely prepared simple food. The conversation could then wander from science to recipes, from music to wines, always enlightened by Steve’s deep sense of humor.

Steve had a very broad culture. Among many other things, his knowledge of French vineyards was amazing. When we moved to France, we bought a house not far from a small but renowned vineyard called “Côte-Rôtie”. Shortly after, I visited Steve and Cynthia and told them about our new house. Steve then immediately explained that it is made of two hills, “Côte brune” and “Côte blonde” that give distinctly different wines, all things that I did not know yet at that time!

He will be missed by all of us.

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July 2014

News from Matrix Biology journal

Dear Fellow Matrix Biologists,

I hope you are active and well. I would like to give you an update on the editorial activities of “your” journal, Matrix Biology. We have achieved several milestones in just 1.5 year.

– The number of submissions has markedly increased and the time required for review is significantly shorter.
– We have published a Special Issue on Proteoglycan Biology edited by Liliana Schaefer, volume 35 of the current issue. This is an open access issue and encompasses 31 articles, a blend of original research articles and minireviews by prominent scientists in the field.
– A new Special Issue on Matricellular Proteins edited by Joanne Murphy-Ullrich will soon be published. For more details, click here. Many of the accepted papers belong to this special issue.
– We have continued the new tradition of Matrix Biology Highlights and Matrix Biologists in Action (click on links).
– Finally, we believe our impact is on the way up. Thompson Reuter will release the IF by the end of July, but a new algorithm of Elsevier, called Impact per Publication (IPP), gives 3.533.

Please, continue submitting your best research to Matrix Biology!

I like to thank our publisher Kaia Motter and all the Elsevier staff for their support.

All the best,

Renato V. Iozzo, M.D.
Editor-In-Chief, Matrix Biology

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February 2014

News from Matrix Biology journal

From Renato V. Iozzo, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief, Matrix Biology:

Dear Fellow Matrix Biologists,

Please, follow the links to Matrix Biology Highlights and Matrix Biologists in Action just published in the first issue of 2014.

I would like to thank all our colleagues who have done a great job in reviewing more than 50 papers so far for two upcoming special issues. There are several activities that I would like to point out to you:

1. A very nice thematic minireview series edited by Jouni Uitto on “Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissues”. This is an open access series and will be shortly highlighted in a pod on the website.
2. We have completed a Special issue on Proteoglycan Biology edited by Liliana Schaefer, with 31 contributors. Most of the papers are accessible on line in the papers in press. I like to thank Liliana for her efforts in assembling this issue. Hopefully, we will distribute many copies at the Proteoglycan Gordon Research Conference in Proctor NH, this summer, and at the ASMB meeting in Cleveland this fall.
3. Joanne Murphy-Ullrich is actively working on editing a special issue on Matricellular Proteins, with over 20 contributors. This Special Issue should be finished by this summer. Some of the papers are already accessible on line in the papers in press.
4. Maurizio Pacifici is editing a new minireview series on Cartilage Biology, hopefully to be finished by the end of the year.
5. Bill Parks, who just moved to Malibu’ (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center), will edit a Special Issue on Matrix Metalloproteases. If anyone is interested in contributing to this issue, he/she should contact Bill directly.

Please, do not hesitate to contact me directly at renato.iozzo@jefferson.edu, to exchange ideas and proposals.

All the best,
Renato

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May 2013

Matrix biology mourns the loss of one of the giants in the field, Dick Heinegard. Click here to read a celebration of Dick’s life and numerous contributions to the field (see Matrix Biology) put together by Renato Iozzo and several other of Dick’s friends and colleagues.